Willow Pattern & Tobacco – What do they have in common?

As a child, I used to remember my grandmother rubbing snuff. Yes, I said grandmother, not grandfather, he used to use chewing tobacco, Mail Pouch to be specific. I used to get so grossed out by the spittoon at the end of the couch or next to grandma’s recliner. It was so gross! But her spittoon was not so pretty either. Hers was an old Folgers metal coffee can with a plastic lid!

The picture above is one of my most favorite pieces. It is a Royal Doulton Spittoon. It is an evergreen colored pattern on a mustard glazed background. It is the only piece I have with this color scheme. The pattern is simply meticulous. I truly wonder what other “interesting” pieces they made in this pattern. It is probably easier to see table ware than pieces like this.

My next piece of Tobacco willow is a tiny little tobacco jar with a brass rim.

This adorable little tobacco jar is made in Paris and is marked with a G….and I can’t tell what the second letter is. It is also marked Dipose as well as Paris France. I love that it is made to look like a stack of blue willow plates. I am guessing this would have been made for a beautify lady like my grandmother. I just don’t see a man carrying something like this around to hold their tobacco or snuff! Anyway, these are two of my favorite pieces.

If anyone has any info on the mark on the tobacco jar, I am all ears. My research hasn’t produced any additional information. By the way I think this may be my only willow from France!

I hope you are staying safe, searching for new willow surprises and staying warm!

Happy willowing.

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